Archive for P. Sundae

EuroChomp SausageFest 2009: Knödelsuppe

Posted in EUROCHOMP with tags , on June 24, 2009 by chomposaurus

knode
And here is the crown glory of my adventures in euromeatland: Knödelsuppe, a ball of the most mouth-watering, soft, succulent meatloaf you’ve ever tasted floating in a buttery broth of spicy goodness. The meat itself, who cares what was in it? It tasted like someone had rubbed your favorite roast in just the right amount of lard and butter and then grinded it up before cooking it in a pot of boiling broth. I have to admit, I don’t remember it too precisely, because I was so consumed by consuming it that my memory is a bit hazy. But as they say back home: it was real good.

We ate this wonder at the biergarten in the Viktualienmarkt, Munich’s outdoor meat and produce market. It’s an absolutely fabulous place to eat on a spring or summer night, and it attracts a nice mix of locals that gives you a fine and friendly view of the people of Munich. Sit at one of the tables WITH a table cloth if you want wench service; otherwise you have to navigate the separate beer and meat stands yourself.

EuroChomp SausageFest 2009: Maxi Doner, the Pork Sundae of Munich

Posted in EUROCHOMP, Pork Sundae, Restaurant BBQ, REVIEWS [Restaurants] with tags , on June 10, 2009 by chomposaurus

Doner is a Turkish specialty, and since Germany has a lot of Turkish communities, it is now a German specialty as well, so much so that while in Italy later in the trip, we found Doner signs in German. Normally, ordering straight up “doner” (just say that one magic word) will get you a pita or gyro-wrap filled to the brim with shaved lamb meat, tomato, lettuce or cabbage, and yogurt sauce. But at one magical Munich doner hut, blissfully open late after many pints of dunkel, Doner was taken to the next level. For there, on the sign, was the Maxi Doner.

maxidoner

It was, quite simply, the pork sundae of the continent. Atop a layer of shaved doner chicken lay fresh-fried greasy fries, doused in garlicky yogurt goodness. It’s great food for the well-lubricated mind: greasy, hot, meaty and easy to eat and transport. Mushing all three primary ingredients together created the perfect blend of potato grease, grilled meat grease, and yogurt grease, ready to do battle with whatever you’ve drank that evening. So even though we’d eaten dinner 3 hours ago, and some spaghetti ice two hours ago, we both finished our Maxi’s without a second thought.

If someone were to open up a stand selling these next to a state school football stadium, they would become millionaires in a fortnight.

EuroChomp SausageFest 2009: Zurich Bratwurst

Posted in Bratwurst, EUROCHOMP, KNOW YOUR SAUSAGE with tags , on June 8, 2009 by chomposaurus

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It’s no secret that I’ll go anywhere for a good hot beef injection. So it should be no surprise that a couple weeks ago I loaded up the camera and my ravenous belly into an American Airlines 767 and headed over the pond to Europe for some truly old-school feasting. I met in Zurich with my longtime friend and meat-mate, P. Sundae, who has reported on delicious treats around the globe for Chomposaurus. Over the next 8 days we traveled to Munich, Vaduz, Milan and the Swiss Alps in search of some of the tastiest sausage, loaves and roasts Europe had to offer.

After I arrived, our crew wasted no time. After a stop off in church to pray for the intestinal and circulatory fortitude needed to survive our quest, we ended up at the grill at Vorderer Sternen, downtown Zurich’s number one summer stop for freshly grilled sausage and chicken. We each ordered a Bratwurst, which came with a slug of mustard and chunk of rock-hard fresh bread.

zurichtable
The sausage was delightfully charred on the outside, lending it a superb, flaky texture without impeding taste. For the inside was soft and juicy. For the first time in my life, I can say it tasted like chicken in a good way: light and tender with just the right amount of salt. Of course, the addition of gobs of ridiculously spicy mustard helped. Throughout the entire sausage-inhaling process, it cleared my sinuses with every bite. Fortunately we had the summer drink of choice in Zurich, the Panache – a mixture of fizzy lemon lime soda with a light beer.

zurich1

Kind of wish I tried Swiss Chicken Nuggets.

Kind of wish I had tried the Swiss Chicken Nuggets.


Jet-lagged and delirious, and now packed full of meat, I managed to make it through my first day in Zurich without collapsing. And a good thing, too, because we were heading to Munich the very next morning. Devilish things awaited us there… just as they await you, dear reader, over the next couple weeks.
Best coke machine ever.

Best coke machine ever.

The Rhyme of the Ancient Manatee Hunter

Posted in STRANGE MEAT, STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , on April 16, 2009 by chomposaurus

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As part of our dream of operating a sustainable organic manatee farm on Isla Mujeres, my friend P. Sundae and I are always doing research on the web about manatee meat facts and figures. P. asked me how much meat a typical manatee yields, and since I am his knowledge broker when it comes to aquatic mammals, I found an article with the answer – and so much more. Click here for the full tale – it’s like The Old Man and the Sea but really one-sided.

Hunting for manatees in the 1960’s was an adventure. It was a special expedition to get meat for the family and for the village. You were almost a hero when you announced that you had caught a manatee and had processed over 500 pounds of meat for the village.

Preparations began two days in advance after you announced it so that the villagers knew that there would be a fresh supply of meat for the table. Trust me, in a fishing village where one ate fish three times a day, a change to meat was like Christmas. Manatee meat sold, as far as I can remember, for ten cents a pound fresh or salted. Most families purchased ten or fifteen pounds and preserved it with salt so that it could last for a few days. To go hunting one needed a fairly large boat with an outboard motor as some chasing had to be done after the manatee was spotted. Then you needed a harpoon with a fairly long and strong rope. You also needed a fairly large and heavy wooden club. Yes, a large sharp knife was necessary to rip open the half inch thick skin of the animal and then to fillet and process the meat.

Word of the Day: Speckmantel

Posted in Pork, STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , , on March 10, 2009 by chomposaurus

baconbackpack
German, meaning “Bacon Jacket.” Our loyal correspondent P. Sundae sends this brief dispatch:

…saw this in the grocery store and thought you would enjoy it. It’s a wienerli wearing a Speckmantel (that’s a real German word, and yes, it means “Bacon Jacket”) and carrying a cheese wheel on its back.

Apparently the word is usually used to describe bacon-wrapped foods. I think I shall start referring to such delicacies this way; for example, “that filet is wearing a bacon jacket.”

Review: Alaska’s Best King Salmon Jerky

Posted in Alaska's Best Salmon, Jerky with tags , , on October 1, 2008 by chomposaurus


Correspondent P. Sundae writes in to tell us that of all the wild salmon jerky he’s tried, this is definitely the best. Of course it’s the only salmon jerky he’s tried, but that doesn’t matter; it’s still delicious, if incredibly salty (our guess: preserving fish takes even more salt than beef or pork). The rich, red taste of salmon survives the curing, however, and combines especially well with the teriyaki flavor. It’s a perfect compliment to your Delaware scrapple for that vice presidential debate!

Strange Meats: Crocodile Carpaccio

Posted in Crocodile, STRANGE MEAT with tags , , on September 17, 2008 by chomposaurus


Carpaccio is one of the best ways to enjoy the true essence of dead animal: it’s raw slices of meat, usually beef or pork, pounded very thin and served with garnishes. You get all the true aromas of the meat in a big, bold way. But P. Sundae found himself in South Africa faced with a very different type of carpaccio: crocodile. Here’s his report:


“The crocodile was much paler than expected. Similar to turkey, perhaps. It was served on slices of tomato, topped with cranberry. The restaurant was called De Kelder, which is supposedly the oldest Afrikaans restaurant in Port Elizabeth (PE, as the locals call it). I managed to choke down the entire Croc plate between bites of freshly baked bread. The texture was pleasant, not slimy or anything. And it had a good flavor, even raw, but the striations of fat made it tough to chew. Overall, I would say there’s a reason it’s hard to find. However my new motto is “Eat as many animals as possible before you die (from eating animals).”

So in other words, it’s edible, but not nearly as tasty as some good ol’ fashioned Florida gator.

Antelope Steak

Posted in Antelope, Game, STRANGE MEAT with tags , , on September 2, 2008 by chomposaurus


Ubercorrespondent P. Sundae reports from South Africa:

Antelope steak, the result of population control in national parks, is dark red, gamey meat and is extremely juicy. It goes great with Mrs. Ball’s, the famous South African chutney, visible in the picture above. Overall, it was “a little chewy, but very tasty.”


According to Mr. Sundae’s park rangers, antelope meat can be produced more efficiently than beef, pork and other domestic meats; however, I couldn’t find any evidence for this on the web. All the proceeds from antelope meat go back to the parks of South Africa.

(both photos by P. Sundae)

Know Your Sausage: Cervelat

Posted in Cervelat, KNOW YOUR SAUSAGE with tags , , , on August 11, 2008 by chomposaurus

Chomposaurus correspondent at-large P. Sundae recently partook of Switzerland’s national treasure – and no, I’m not talking about knives or Nazi gold – during his hike up the Schnebelhorn, near Zurich. You see, there is nothing the swiss love more than their sausage. And the most popular sausage there, by far, is the cervelat. The Swiss eat 160 million of them per year, which is quite impressive for a country of 7.5 million people.

Yes, that’s right. That cervelat’s got cheese and bacon stuffed INSIDE of it. That’s how they like to eat it. Traditionalists will even cut a cross into either end of the sausage so it curls open like a beautiful star of meat.
The sausage itself is made of a mixture of beef, pork and spices. Most sources suggest garlic is the primary spice, although it varies based on the producer.

Currently, though, there’s a cervelat crisis in Switzerland. The type of cow intestine used to wrap the sausage, called Zebu, is produced only in Brazil. Unfortunately, EU rules have prevented the import of any beef products from Brazil due to their lack of adequate precautions against mad cow disease. It’s estimated that, if imports don’t resume, the Swiss will run out of sausage by Aug 1, 2009 – Swiss National Day, the number one day for sausage consumption in the country. As the New York Times reports, this has left even reserved Swiss in a state of despair.

So go enjoy your cervelat while you can. And when you’re grilling, don’t forget the chocholate banana for desert:

The Pork Sundae

Posted in Pork, Pork Sundae, Restaurant BBQ, STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , , , on July 1, 2008 by chomposaurus


It’s so brilliant, I can’t believe they don’t sell it on every street corner in the city and along every boardwalk on the beach. Allow me to introduce you to the Pork Sundae, served in a (styrofoam) pint glass. A layer of baked beans on the bottom, creamy coleslaw in the middle, a hearty heaping of pulled pork on top. With drizzled BBQ sauce playing the part of chocolate syrup, of course. Despite what you might think at first, the result is neither disgusting nor overpowering; it’s like eating a hearty, meaty stew with a fork. One might even find it analogous to a very sweet chili. And don’t worry about the cole slaw; I’m not the biggest fan myself, but the sweet crunch of the lettuce fits perfectly with the mushy beans and chewy pork. The important part is that all the ingredients are fresh, which they were at Blackwater BBQ in College Park, Orlando. But it wouldn’t be hard to whip up your own version, which would probably be a hit at any 4th of July Party. Just don’t steal my idea of opening a pork sundae stand on the beach.