Archive for the World of Meat Category

You Cannot Get Swine Flu from Pork, Bacon or Delicious Ham

Posted in KNOW YOUR PIG, MEAT POLITICS, Pork, STUFF ABOUT MEAT, World of Meat with tags , , , on April 28, 2009 by chomposaurus

swine2What’s in a name? When it comes to today’s trendy new illness (move over, tapeworms!), Swine Flu, there simply is not much to fear in its etymology. True, the virus contains pig DNA; it also contains genetic material from humans and birds. It’s really, really difficult to spread a virus from pigs to humans. It happens about once a year. The bad stuff (i.e. Albert Camus’s The Plague) happens when the human who gets it does an above-average job of spreading it to other members of his species. Then the virate mutates, gets a passport, goes abroad, etc.

What I’m trying to say is: Bacon is still ok! Eat all the pork sausage you want. Don’t go all Indonesia on me and start dumping your Honey Baked Hams down the toilet. In the rare case of swine->man transmission, the swine would need to be alive, and you’d probably need to be bathing in its blood, Carrie-style. But even then, the chances of Carrie getting the flu are very low; she’d have to be bathing in the blood every day, or be a child with bad immune defenses who spent a creepy amount of time in the pig booth at the county fair. Don’t listen to me, listen to the CDC! In fact, doctors have yet to disprove that the flu can’t be cured with some good old-fashioned Swinetussin.

Ok, so let’s review:

Highly Likely to Infect You

Highly Likely to Infect You

Highly Likely to be Delicious

Highly Likely to be Delicious

Meat Should Be Expensive

Posted in MEAT POLITICS, World of Meat with tags on October 29, 2008 by chomposaurus

Ezra Klein takes a long look at the extraordinarily dumb and hopefully collapsing system of meat production in the United States.

Overconsumption of meat imposes huge costs on both the environment and on public health. And that’s to say nothing of the indefensible cruelty that characterizes CAFO operations. Yet we spend billions to subsidize ever cheaper meat. And billions more to treat the ill health that results from our meat-heavy diets. And we will pay billions, even trillions, more, to handle the environmental damage that eventually results from these policies. It’s an incredibly odd state of affairs, like paying someone to touch up your house with lead paint.

I recently paid $6.99 for a frozen package of five chicken fingers from Whole Foods (review coming). Does this make me particularly happy? No. Because I’m used to having the equivalent of five chicken fingers of meat for probably half of my meals in a week, and that expectation is both unrealistic and increasingly harmful. Remember that in a market economy, you can pay for something with more than money: time, political capital, dead bodies, etc. We’ve been buying our meat on environmental and societal credit, and the interest charges are about to go way up.

(H/T: Andrew Sullivan)

Black Helicopters above the Meat Wall

Posted in MEAT POLITICS, World of Meat with tags , , on September 8, 2008 by chomposaurus

Running above the fold on the Drudge Report last night was a story about a new report from Dr Rajendra Pachauri, chairman of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, saying people should endeavor to have at least one meat-free day per week.

As an avid meat fan, I agree 100%. People should eat less meat. Not even because of global warming, but for themselves and their pocketbooks.

Here’s what I think is the biggest problem: “Vegetarianism” is regarded as a lifestyle and (worse) a political choice, instead of just a cuisine. Few people say “we’re going out for vegetarian tonight” the way they might say “we’re going out for thai.” But there’s no reason not to. Eating delicious vegetarian food is almost as simple as calling Domino’s and ordering a plain pizza.

One important note: although it would be helpful in some regards, being a vegetarian who eats a ton of cheese and eggs does not do much to reduce the global warming impact, since, as the article states, there’s wave of flatulence behind the meat wall.

7 Great Healthy (Meat) Eating Blogs

Posted in MEAT POLITICS, STUFF ABOUT MEAT, World of Meat with tags , , , on July 17, 2008 by chomposaurus

The web spawns blogs about basically everything. For instance: meat-eating. So, of course, there are many excellent writers working on the topic on eating well, whether that means eating organic, eating local, eating slow or just eating less. Here’s a list of our current seven favorite blogs about eatin’ good and eatin’ good for you.

Sustainable Table
Creative and original articles about eating organic and local food within the confines of modern life. For instance, a recent report talks about the delights of the “Urban Chicken.”

Slow Food
An amazing organization dedicated “to counteract fast food and fast life, the disappearance of local food traditions and people’s dwindling interest in the food they eat, where it comes from, how it tastes and how our food choices affect the rest of the world.”

U.S. Food Policy Blog
The Ethicurean
Two blogs covering the government food policy and media food coverage, with a lot of intelligent commentary.

Local Harvest
This site compiles all the farmers’ markets, family farms and local groceries where you can buy local, organic food. Find some delicious meats near you.

Eat Local Challenge
Besides bringing up many interesting points about eating locally, this blog features a fantastic list of eating-local blogs, which come in handy.

Eat Like Me
This site is creative in a way only the internet allows: you can see what a very healthy, fit, good-looking person eats for every meal, every day. Tons of good ideas, and kind of inspiring.

Chomposaurus wants more healthy eating blogs! If you know some good ones, submit them to us. I’m pretty disappointed we didn’t find a single “organic meat” blog… until such blog appears, you’ll have to stick with us.

The Slaughter of a Pig, Becal, Mexico

Posted in MEAT POLITICS, Pork, STUFF ABOUT MEAT, World of Meat with tags , , , , , on June 13, 2008 by chomposaurus


The modern American meat eater has at least a passing awareness of where his or her meat comes from. By now, sustained campaigns from all corners of the food world, including farmers, journalists, politicians and vegangelicals, have illustrated the origins and consequences of eating meat, for better or worse. Images of happy “organic” cows or caged, mutilated veal are not hard to find, and the typical carnivore now navigates bans on foie gras, veal and transfat along with crazed excesses like Hardy’s Thickburgers or the turducken.

But in America, one thing we do not do much is slaughter our own meat. We do not go face to face with the animal we are about to ingest. Although hunting remains popular, with about 12 million Americans going after game or fowl each year, it’s still undertaken by relatively small fraction of the population, with even fewer actually eating what they kill (if they manage to shoot anything at all). Bottom line: we are separated from what we eat, even if, thanks to the internet and increased consumer awareness, it is by a thinner line.

Such is not the case in Becal, a small town outside Merida, the capitol of the state of Campeche, Mexico. Our correspondent P. Sundae went to this scorchingly beautiful area this spring on a mission to help build new schools. One night, at a large gathering of some of the local residents, P. and his fellow builders were treated to full-on pig roast. What they hadn’t expected was to see the actual pig they were about to eat slaughtered and cleaned in front of them. It was a moving and at times brutal experience. Fortunately, P. was wise enough to document it. What follows are pictures and videos from before, during and after – including graphic images of the pig being killed and then prepared. Although you may be initially repulsed or disturbed, you will hopefully find them as fascinating as I did. Few of us here in America understand what and how we eat – and in this way, we are less advanced than most of the world.

Due to their intense content, the pictures & video are on a separate page. Click here to view them.

Beef Riots Erupt in South Korea

Posted in MEAT POLITICS, World of Meat with tags , , on June 10, 2008 by chomposaurus


Apparently, Koreans have done a particularly good job of convincing themselves that American beef is teeming with mad cow disease, even though the cases reported here have been small and isolated. They could be right – there’s certainly a lack of adequate oversight here, so we could all be dead in ten years – but it’s unlikely. Either way, the South Korean government’s decision to reopen their markets to American beef has been met with gigantic protests.

Tens of thousands of demonstrators filled central Seoul to protest [the] agreement to resume suspended imports of American beef and to denounce a broad range of other government policies… Overhead, large balloons carried banners that read “Judgement day for Lee Myung Bak” and “Re-negotiate the beef deal.” One widely distributed leaflet said: “Mad cow drives our people mad!”

Of course, what they’re really protesting is a stagnant economy and high oil prices, but there aren’t as many catchy slogans for that. I’m just glad that we have a chance to talk about “beef riots” with a straight face.

100% Bacon Burger

Posted in Burgers, MEAT POLITICS, Pork, Seafood, STUFF ABOUT MEAT, World of Meat with tags , , , , on June 4, 2008 by chomposaurus


They should give out a MacArthur Genius Grant for meat. I think people like Kirk who make a burger out of 100% ground bacon deserve some sort of financial support to continue to do their work; who knows how our lives would be bettered? Maybe Jessica Simpson’s crazy dream of chicken wings made from grass-fed organic buffalo would finally come true; maybe we could even save the manatee and solve world hunger through off-shore manatee farming. Someday soon, you’ll find the Chomposaurus Foundation for Better Meat at chomposaurus.org; until that day, enjoy the pictures of this unbelievable creation, and don’t be afraid to dream.