Archive for the STUFF ABOUT MEAT Category

A New Record for World’s Largest Meatball

Posted in STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags on September 8, 2009 by chomposaurus

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It may be a publicity stunt, but it sure is one spicy meatball. When I see it, my only instinct is to pick the metaball up (if I could lift a 110 pound meatball) and throw it at the first person I can find wearing a tux.

CANCÚN, Mexico — To promote their upcoming film “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs”, Sony Pictures asked the chefs at The Ritz Carlton to cook a 109 lbs (49.5 kg) meatball-setting the world record for the largest meatball.
after the record for the largest meatball was confirmed, the meatball was cut up into normal-sized portions and served to everyone at the record-setting event.
The Hotel’s Executive chef Rainer Zinngrebe along with banquet chef Aldo Novoa accomplished the appetizing feat, surpassing a previous Guinness world record for the largest meatball set in 2008 that stood at 32.93 kg, or 72 lbs., 9 oz.

Story from World Records Academy. More pictures here. Note that no one mentions what type of meat was actually used…

The Best Wikipedia Article Ever and the Holy Doner Grail

Posted in STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , , on June 4, 2009 by chomposaurus

Take my breath away...

Take my breath away...


Two things that speak for themselves.

Wikipedia:
Article – List of kebabs around the world.

Google image search:
Kebabpizza.

Review: Lava Lake Lamb – Ground Lamb

Posted in Burgers, Organic Mail Order Meat with tags on May 15, 2009 by chomposaurus

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This month, Lava Lake Lamb, purveyors of fine organic baby sheep, were kind enough to not only kill and butcher some sweet little delicious sheep for me, they even agreed to send them to my house for free. I got a one pound packet of ground organic lamb, and did what any good American would do: I made me some burgers.

One of the best things about lamb is that it’s far more forgiving than beef for the amateur cook – it cooks more slowly and more evenly, and it does not lose nearly as much flavor between medium-rare and medium as a piece of steak will. That’s not to say you should burn it, of course. I cooked these burgers in the broiler – following Mark Bittman’s recipe for lamb burgers with cumin and onion. After 11 minutes they came out just right, pink in the middle but not red.

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The taste? Well that was divine. Lamb does indeed have a gamier flavor than beef, but it has a finer texture. This lamb was extremely juicy and it was enhanced by but not lost to the spices and onions. Generous portions of ketchup and mustard also aided the cause. But most remarkable is the sheer quantity of taste packed into each bite. With high quality meat, more flavor almost always means better flavor, and Lava Lake’s ground lamb is no exception. I suggest heading over to their site and ordering a pound or two today to try for yourself.

Next we’ll be attempting to roast one of their boneless legs of lamb. Wish us luck!

Obama Gets a Burger in Hell

Posted in Burgers, STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags on May 5, 2009 by chomposaurus

Obama
What better way to celebrate Cinco de Mayo then treating Joe Biden (and half the Washington Press Corp) to some bunned steak from Ray’s Hell-Burger, the famously horror-movie-themed beefery in Arlington, VA? There’s excellent video below, in which you can hear how Obama likes his burger, as well as the great moment when the owner, Tim Murray, has to explain to the President of the United States that they don’t do french fries, they do fried cheddar cheese potato balls.

VIDEO here.

Some reviews of Ray’s here, here and here. a

The Real Swine Flu is Caused by Eating Too Much Damn Ham

Posted in STUFF ABOUT MEAT on May 1, 2009 by chomposaurus

This concert poster is cool and relevant.

This concert poster is cool and relevant.


I know some of you won’t like to hear this, but you can’t eat steak and ham two meals a day and enjoy the benefits of our society’s advances in healthcare. You may as well be smoking two packs and drinking a fifth of cinnamon schnapps every day too. And unless you are as rich as Lord Heinrich Goldschlager himself, you’re probably eating pretty terrible meat anyway. I’ll let the NYTimes say the rest.

There was a time when red meat was a luxury for ordinary Americans, or was at least something special: cooking a roast for Sunday dinner, ordering a steak at a restaurant. Not anymore. Meat consumption has more than doubled in the United States in the last 50 years.

Now a new study of more than 500,000 Americans has provided the best evidence yet that our affinity for red meat has exacted a hefty price on our health and limited our longevity.

The study found that, other things being equal, the men and women who consumed the most red and processed meat were likely to die sooner, especially from one of our two leading killers, heart disease and cancer, than people who consumed much smaller amounts of these foods.

Quality Fast Food: Kelly’s Roast Beef

Posted in Beef, Kelly's Roast Beef, REVIEWS [Restaurants], STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , , , , on April 30, 2009 by chomposaurus

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On my recent triumphant return to the Chomposaurus breeding grounds of Boston, MA, I visited a mecca of meat that I had strangely neglected during my initial tenure there. Kelly’s Roast Beef has a few locations in the Boston area (for this review we went to the original at Revere Beach), pumping out metric tons of sandwiches, fried foods and chowder to the hungry New England masses. Indeed, my carnivorous companion Wyoming Rose and I were amazed that “Medium Onion Ring” equaled a literal half-a-square-foot cube of deep-fried flaky battered rings. Needless to say we did not finish them, even though they were flaky, fresh and gigantic.

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Before I move on to the main attraction, a warning: do not order the large roast beef sandwich unless you have resigned yourself to an early, coronary-propelled grave. Kelly’s Large Roast Beef Sandwich is two solid hockey pucks’ worth of moist meat packed precariously into a buttery yellow bun. I had difficulty putting it into my mouth, and believe me I have a big mouth. Only the use of generous amounts of barbecue sauce as lube allowed for easy digestion. Well, that and the beef was out of this world. It was as though your local Arby’s had gone to the neighborhood deli and gotten their best brisket for their sandwiches. You won’t top Kelly’s for quality of fast food roast beef. I was fortunate in that I needed a lot of it, too, since I was loading up for the Boston Marathon. Not to run it, mind you; but to be able to absorb the six hours of beer that watching it from the street requires.

Rose and I were also impressed with the quality of the service. You see, when the beefsmith taking our order asked what we wanted on our sandwiches, I foolishly said “everything,” figuring this was a Chicago Vienna Dog type situation. He paused and looked up at me. “Really?” He said, “Everything is pretty disgusting.” He listed about 20 items, most of which would not go together. I settled for cheese, onions, pickles and barbecue sauce – a good choice, although horseradish was also tempting. They also had no problem giving us extra buckets of bbq sauce to dip our rings in. Hooray for Yankee kindness.

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So if you have a hankering for the best beef you can eat in 10 minutes or less, Kelly’s is your place. And perhaps, finally, I have found someone to help me forget my first true roast beef love, Rax. Although it’s hard to replace lemonade served in a plastic alligator.

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You Cannot Get Swine Flu from Pork, Bacon or Delicious Ham

Posted in KNOW YOUR PIG, MEAT POLITICS, Pork, STUFF ABOUT MEAT, World of Meat with tags , , , on April 28, 2009 by chomposaurus

swine2What’s in a name? When it comes to today’s trendy new illness (move over, tapeworms!), Swine Flu, there simply is not much to fear in its etymology. True, the virus contains pig DNA; it also contains genetic material from humans and birds. It’s really, really difficult to spread a virus from pigs to humans. It happens about once a year. The bad stuff (i.e. Albert Camus’s The Plague) happens when the human who gets it does an above-average job of spreading it to other members of his species. Then the virate mutates, gets a passport, goes abroad, etc.

What I’m trying to say is: Bacon is still ok! Eat all the pork sausage you want. Don’t go all Indonesia on me and start dumping your Honey Baked Hams down the toilet. In the rare case of swine->man transmission, the swine would need to be alive, and you’d probably need to be bathing in its blood, Carrie-style. But even then, the chances of Carrie getting the flu are very low; she’d have to be bathing in the blood every day, or be a child with bad immune defenses who spent a creepy amount of time in the pig booth at the county fair. Don’t listen to me, listen to the CDC! In fact, doctors have yet to disprove that the flu can’t be cured with some good old-fashioned Swinetussin.

Ok, so let’s review:

Highly Likely to Infect You

Highly Likely to Infect You

Highly Likely to be Delicious

Highly Likely to be Delicious

The Rhyme of the Ancient Manatee Hunter

Posted in STRANGE MEAT, STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , on April 16, 2009 by chomposaurus

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As part of our dream of operating a sustainable organic manatee farm on Isla Mujeres, my friend P. Sundae and I are always doing research on the web about manatee meat facts and figures. P. asked me how much meat a typical manatee yields, and since I am his knowledge broker when it comes to aquatic mammals, I found an article with the answer – and so much more. Click here for the full tale – it’s like The Old Man and the Sea but really one-sided.

Hunting for manatees in the 1960’s was an adventure. It was a special expedition to get meat for the family and for the village. You were almost a hero when you announced that you had caught a manatee and had processed over 500 pounds of meat for the village.

Preparations began two days in advance after you announced it so that the villagers knew that there would be a fresh supply of meat for the table. Trust me, in a fishing village where one ate fish three times a day, a change to meat was like Christmas. Manatee meat sold, as far as I can remember, for ten cents a pound fresh or salted. Most families purchased ten or fifteen pounds and preserved it with salt so that it could last for a few days. To go hunting one needed a fairly large boat with an outboard motor as some chasing had to be done after the manatee was spotted. Then you needed a harpoon with a fairly long and strong rope. You also needed a fairly large and heavy wooden club. Yes, a large sharp knife was necessary to rip open the half inch thick skin of the animal and then to fillet and process the meat.

Hey, People, We Need to Fear Tuna More Than Is Commonly Assumed

Posted in Seafood, STUFF ABOUT MEAT with tags , on March 27, 2009 by chomposaurus

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These suckers are huge!


In all honesty, I was reading Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly (finally) and Anthony Bourdain’s description of the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo fascinated me. I googled it and got these crazy pics of giant fish. It once again drove home the point: when you eat delicious tuna, you are eating a fish that is the size of a golden retriever. And just like a golden retriever, the tuna’s vacant stare conceals a desire to tear the flesh from your bones and devour the sweet string-cheese of your tendons.

In totally unrelated news, my girlfriend’s taking me out for seafood tonight. More detail about the Tokyo tuna auction here. Great video from
the same source of the auction (hooray silly Japanese yelling!):

My Pork Chop is a Chocolate Cake!

Posted in Fake Meat, STUFF ABOUT MEAT, WEBCOMICS with tags on March 25, 2009 by chomposaurus

The Chocochop: a delicious deception. From Dinosaur Comics; full details on the construction of the chocolate cake pork chop here.

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